Going into the bid process, we had no idea about the best way to tear down the Smokestack. I would have loved to have imploded it and charged admission and pay-per-view to cover the costs. However, the demolition permit specifically excluded blowing it up. In the end, Evans Brothers, Inc. had a fairly elegant solution. They had a machine that ate the Smokestack from the top down, with the debris falling inside. That method avoided massive scaffolding and kept everyone safer.
Demolition Day     (Photos courtesy of Cowellian, Bill Larkins, and Mark Weinmann)

Day 1 - Starting at the top

Day 1 - Starting at the top

Day 1 - Starting at the top

Day 1 - Starting at the top

Smokestack Demolition

Smokestack Demolition

Smokestack Demolition

Smokestack Demolition

Smokestack Demolition

Smokestack Demolition

Smokestack Demolition

Smokestack Demolition

Smokestack Demolition

Smokestack Demolition

Smokestack Demolition

Smokestack Demolition

Smokestack Demolition

Smokestack Demolition

Smokestack Demolition

Smokestack Demolition

Smokestack Demolition

Smokestack Demolition

Photo of Smokestack taken during the Pre-Bid ConferenceAt the pre-bid conference, I took a picture of the Smokestack from in  front of the CHOA Business Office. Then, during the demolition, I took a picture from the same spot every evening, after the work had stopped.

Day 1

Day 1

Day 2

Day 2

Day 3

Day 3

Day 4

Day 4

Day 5

Day 5

Day 6

Day 6

Day 7

Day 7

Day 8

Day 8

Panoramic view of the Constructiob Site provided by Mark Weinmann

Smokestack Demolition

logo_cowell

Cowell Historical Society

Website_Design_NetObjects_Fusion

News

KRON-4

KRON-4

KPIX-5

KPIX-5